Oceania/Antarctic

Oceania

Easter Island, a Chilean territory, is a remote volcanic island in Polynesia. Its native name is Rapa Nui. It’s famed for archaeological sites, including nearly 900 monumental statues called Moai, created by inhabitants during the 13th–16th centuries. The Moai are carved human figures with oversize heads, often resting on massive stone pedestals called Ahus. Ahu Tongariki has the largest group of upright Moai. In 1995, UNESCO named Easter Island a World Heritage Site, with much of the island protected within Rapa Nui National Park

 Landmarks /  Oceania/Antarctic

Antarctica, the southernmost continent and site of the South Pole, is a virtually uninhabited, ice-covered landmass. Most cruises to the continent visit the Antarctic Peninsula, which stretches toward South America. It’s known for the Lemaire Channel and Paradise Harbor, striking, iceberg-flanked passageways, and Port Lockroy, a former British research station turned museum. The peninsula’s isolated terrain also shelters rich wildlife, including many penguins.Antarctica is a de facto condominium, governed by parties to the Antarctic Treaty System that have consulting status. Twelve countries signed the Antarctic Treaty in 1959, and thirty-eight have signed it since then. The treaty prohibits military activities and mineral mining, prohibits nuclear explosions and nuclear waste disposal, supports scientific research, and protects the continent's ecozone. Ongoing experiments are conducted by more than 4,000 scientists from many nations.

 Landmarks /  Oceania/Antarctic

Kamchatka is a 1,250km-long peninsula in the Russian Far East. Kamchatka is extremely geologically active and has numerous volcanoes, geysers, hot springs and even a lake of acid. It contains the southernmost expanse of arctic tundra in the world and is notable for its wealth of arctic wildlife, fish, game, and marine life. Nineteen of Kamchatka's volcanoes constitute the "Volcanoes of Kamchatka" UNESCO World Heritage Site. A vast volcanic peninsula that is almost entirely wilderness, Kamchatka is a place of extraordinary primal beauty, rushing rivers, hot springs and snow-capped peaks. Getting here takes time and effort, and exploring the region even more so, but few visitors leave anything other than awestruck.

 Countries /  Oceania/Antarctic

Anchorage, Alaska’s largest city, is in the south-central part of the state on the Cook Inlet. It's known for its cultural sites, including the Alaska Native Heritage Center, which displays traditional crafts, stages dances, and presents replicas of dwellings from the area’s indigenous groups. The city is also a gateway to nearby wilderness areas and mountains including the Chugach, Kenai, and Talkeetna. Anchorage is the place where young spirits and adventurous souls come to play. Alaska activities including famous wildlife, spectacular mountain vistas, fascinating cultures and icy blue glaciers all await your discovery. Metropolitan luxuries mix with unrivaled natural wonders to make Anchorage an unforgettable destination.

 Countries /  Oceania/Antarctic

Perth, capital of Western Australia, sits where the Swan River meets the southwest coast. Sandy beaches line its suburbs, and the huge, riverside Kings Park and Botanic Garden on Mount Eliza offer sweeping views of the city. The Perth Cultural Centre houses the state ballet and opera companies and occupies its own central precinct, including a theatre, library and the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Nature and urban life exist in harmony in Perth, on Australia's west coast. Here, where the locals soak up more sunny days than in any other Australian capital city, you can visit nearby Rottnest Island, walk-in leafy Kings Park and tour Swan Valley vineyards. For local culture, wander the nearby city of Fremantle's winding portside streets and Perth city center's museum and gallery precinct.

 Australia /  Oceania/Antarctic

Honolulu, on the island of Oahu’s south shore, is capital of Hawaii and gateway to the U.S. island chain. The Waikiki neighborhood is its center for dining, nightlife, and shopping, famed for its iconic crescent beach backed by palms and high-rise hotels, with volcanic Diamond Head crater looming in the distance. Sites relating to the World War II attack on Pearl Harbor include the USS Arizona Memorial. In this cosmopolitan capital city, you’ll find everything from historic landmarks to fine dining to world-class shopping. Home to the majority of Oahu’s population, Honolulu stretches across the southeastern shores of the island, from Pearl Harbor to Makapuu Point, encompassing world-famous Waikiki Beach along the way.

 Countries /  Oceania/Antarctic

Auckland, based around 2 large harbors, is a major city in the north of New Zealand’s North Island. In the center, the iconic Sky Tower has views of Viaduct Harbour, which is full of superyachts and lined with bars and cafes. Auckland Domain, the city’s oldest park, is based around an extinct volcano and home to the formal Wintergardens. Near Downtown, Mission Bay Beach has a seaside promenade. Rated as the third most liveable city in the world, Auckland is an exhilarating mix of natural wonders and urban adventures. The urban environment where everyone lives within half an hour of beautiful beaches, hiking trails and a dozen enchanting holiday islands. Add a sunny climate, a background rhythm of Polynesian culture and a passion for outstanding food, wine and shopping, and you’re beginning to get the picture of Auckland,

 New Zealand /  Oceania/Antarctic

Melbourne is the coastal capital of the southeastern Australian state of Victoria. Melbourne is the most populous city of the Australian state of Victoria, and the second most populous city in Australia and Oceania. At the city's centre is the modern Federation Square development, with plazas, bars, and restaurants by the Yarra River. In the Southbank area, the Melbourne Arts Precinct is the site of Arts Centre Melbourne – a performing arts complex – and the National Gallery of Victoria, with Australian and indigenous art.

 Australia /  Oceania/Antarctic

Uluru, or Ayers Rock, is a massive sandstone monolith in the heart of the Northern Territory’s arid "Red Centre". The nearest large town is Alice Springs, 450km away. Uluru is sacred to indigenous Australians, Aborigens, and is thought to have started forming around 550 million years ago. It’s within Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, which also includes the 36 red-rock domes of the Kata Tjuta (colloquially “The Olgas”) formation.

 Landmarks /  Oceania/Antarctic