United Kingdom

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United Kingdom

Born and raised in England, Penelope Chilvers originally trained as a painter at the Byam Shaw School of Art in London, and was granted a scholarship from the Spanish Ministry of Culture, to complete an MA at Complutense University in Madrid. Her love affair with Spain and local craftsmanship began long before. As a child, she spent every school holiday in the province of Girona, where she first came across rustic, handmade alpargatas. She has been trying to make the perfect raw edged, bullhide moccasin that only exists in her childhood memories ever since! Penelope lived for a few years in the city of Barcelona, as a painter and designer, where she collaborated with artists and artisans. She worked with woodturners, designed for the textile industry and worked on interesting projects e.g. the restoration of the Picasso Museum. While living in Barcelona, she enjoyed riding in her lunch break in the national park of Collserola in the hills above the city, wearing traditional Spanish riding boots. She pursued the idea of bringing the Spanish riding boot to England and commissioned a small number of traditional artisans in the hills of Spain to make the perfect equestrian boot – our Long Tassel boot - to her own specifications. This boot remains a firm favourite in the collection, most famously worn back in 2004 by Prince William’s then girlfriend, Kate Middleton. Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, continues to wear her boots to this day, most recently on a royal engagement in County Durham to visit Manor Farm. Having returned to the UK, Penelope began to work from her kitchen table, selling over 100 pairs of the Long Tassel Boot in a short space of time to a leading fashion boutique in Notting Hill, called The Cross. From that moment on, she got to work, designing her first comprehensive collection to launch at Paris Fashion Week in 2004. The collection has since grown to include iconic styles, such as the Incredible Boot, our highly sought after après ski boot, the crepe soled Neon Safari boot and a solid offer of Goodyear welted outdoor boots and footwear for experience and adventure.

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Set in the heart of the historic Rother valley landscape, with spiral staircases, battlements and a portcullis, 14th century Bodiam Castle is one of Britain's most picturesque and romantic ancient monuments. One of the most famous and evocative castles in Britain, Bodiam was built in 1385 as both a defence and a comfortable home. The exterior is virtually complete and the ramparts rise dramatically above the moat. Enough of the interior survives to give an impression of castle life. There are spiral staircases and battlements to explore, and wonderful views of the Rother Valley from the top of the towers. In the impressive gatehouse is the castle's original wooden portcullis, an extremely rare example of its kind.

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Windsor Castle has been the home of British kings and queens for almost 1,000 years. It is an official residence of Queen Elizabeth II, whose standard flies from the Round Tower when Her Majesty is in residence. The Queen spends most of her private weekends at Windsor Castle and takes up official residence for a month over Easter, known as 'Easter Court'. The Queen is also at Windsor for one week each June, while attending Royal Ascot and the service of the Order of the Garter at St George’s Chapel. Windsor Castle is still very much a working royal palace and is regularly used for ceremonial and State occasions, including official visits from overseas Heads of State. St George’s Hall makes a spectacular setting for a State Banquet, when a table seating 160 guests is decorated with porcelain and silver-gilt from the Royal Collection. While it was William the Conqueror who first built the castle, he didn’t live in the castle, it was used as a defensive base at the time. The Castle has been enlarged and restructured by different kings and queens during their reigns. Find out more about who built the Castle. The first king to use Windsor Castle as a residence was Henry I. Henry’s marriage to Adela, the daughter of Godfrey of Louvain, took place in the Castle in 1121. The first Plantagenet king, Henry II, lived at Windsor and built extensively there between 1165 and 1179. Windsor was also one of the favourite residences of Henry III, and he invested heavily in the royal accommodation at the Castle during his reign from 1216. It was Edward III who left the greatest impression on Windsor in the 14th-century. Windsor was the intended centre of his court and government, and the seat of the newly founded Order of the Garter.

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Alnwick Castle where they filmed many scenes in the Harry Potter saga exists and is located near the capital. This castle is the residence of the Percy family since 1309 and in this locations were filmed the most beautiful scenes of the Harry Potter films. The castle is still inhabited and is the largest and most beautiful castle after Windsor Castle. The fort opens its gates (it's appropriate to say) six of its countless rooms. On the lawn in front of the castle you can imagine the Quidditch training required by Wizards, including Harry was one of the youngest researchers. But do not be fooled by the film because what you see in the scenes from the long shots, the castle is only a model, in fact there are not some kind of seas or lakes, but the interiors are all real. Not all the scenes that appear in fiml were actually filmed in the castle, for example, some scenes in the corridors were filmed at the University of Oxford Many groups and tourist agencies have made great fortunes with these films and these enchanted places. I will give you some information if you want aggregarvi, but the costs are not low. The Rail Europe Group organizes for you a day from Harry Potter, starting from London and coming up to the castle. HP Fan Trips, after making you see the film places will also show you the places in the book, less known but ugulamente suggestive, as the place where Rowling wrote the final chapter of the saga. The interesting thing is that you will come to the castle with the vintage train, really used to shoot scenes of the film. Really interesting to me that they are fond of Harry Potter and can not wait to come out the last movie.

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Rufford Abbey Country Park is a 150 acre free entry park and tourist attraction in North Nottinghamshire, centered around the ruins of a medieval Abbey. Founded on the edge of Sherwood Forest 870 years ago, Rufford Abbey is today a romantic ruin, set in a beautiful park. Enjoy its nature, art, history, fresh air and fun. From swans and swallows to cheeky squirrels, there's wildlife galore, woodland to wander, sculpture to admire. Spread a picnic blanket, grab a snack in the Cafe or celebrate with afternoon tea in Lord Savile's Victorian kitchen. Our paths are pram and mobility scooter friendly, so whatever your age, it's easy to get around and explore. Set in the heart of Robin Hood Country the park, which is owned by Nottinghamshire County Council, offers native woodland, a lake and gardens as well as a range of attractions, activities and catering options managed by Parkwood Outdoors.

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The Tower of London, founded by William the Conqueror in 1066, is one of the world’s most famous fortresses, and one of Britain’s most visited historic sites. Despite a grim reputation for a place of torture and death, there are so many more stories to be told about the Tower. This powerful and enduring symbol of the Norman Conquest has been enjoyed as a royal palace, served as an armoury and even housed a zoo! An intriguing cast of characters have played their part: including the dastardly jewel-thief Colonel Blood, tragic Lady Jane Grey and maverick zoo keeper Albert Cops. The Tower of London played an important role in the First and Second World Wars. From training WWI recruits in the Tower moat including the Royal Fusiliers (whose headquarters and museum still exists at the Tower of London today), to guarding the infamous Nazi prisoner of war Rudolph Hess, during each devastating conflict the Tower returned to its former role as a military store, barracks and prison. And it became, once again, a grim place of execution for enemies of the state. A total of 12 spies were executed behind the Tower's walls. In 2014 and again in 2018, The Tower of London commemorated the centenary of WWI with two major installations. In 2014, ‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’ marked Britain’s first full day of involvement in the war by filling the moat with 888,246 ceramic poppies while in 2018, ‘Beyond the Deepening Shadows: The Tower Remembers’ saw the moat filled with thousands of flames that commemorated those who lost their lives. Within days of Britain's announcement to enter WWI, young men who worked near the Tower in the City answered the call to enlist. Some formed volunteer brigades with friends or work colleagues. 1300 men who worked for city firms joined the City of London Battalion, pictured here in the Tower moat, waiting to swear the oath of allegiance. By the turn of the 20th Century the Tower of London was seen as a tourist attraction, but the Tower never formally dissolved its function as a garrison, prison and execution site. The fortress actively carried out all three roles during the war, even as it remained open to visitors.

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Blaenavon formed part of the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution, where coal was dug and iron was formed. You can still see countless physical reminders and remains which allow you to trace the development of the Industrial Revolution. At the Centre you can browse the traditional displays and videos that illustrate the extraordinary history of the area and you can delve deeper into the history of Blaenavon by using interactive touch screens to explore a range of topics, including standards of living, geology, transport systems and World Heritage. Blaenavon World Heritage Site is a mix of industrial landscape and natural beauty. To understand the realtionship of both and the development of the town and valley start your visit at the World Heritage Centre in Blaenavon.

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As one of the country’s largest military installations, Charles Fort has been part of some of the most momentous events of Irish history. During the Williamite Wars, for example, it withstood a 13-day siege before it fell. Later, in the Civil War of the early 1920s, anti-Treaty forces on the retreat burned it out. Charles Fort is a massive star-shaped structure of the late seventeenth century, well preserved despite its history. William Robinson, architect of the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham, Dublin, is credited with designing it. Its dimensions are awe-inspiring – some of the outer defences are 16 metres high. Charles Fort is a classic example of a late 17th century star-shaped fort. William Robinson, architect of the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham, Dublin, and Superintendent of Fortifications, is credited with designing the fort.

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No less a figure than St Brendan the Navigator was born in the Ardfert area in the sixth century. He founded a monastery there not long before embarking on his legendary voyage for the Island of Paradise. It was Brendan’s cult that inspired the three medieval churches that stand on the same site today. The earliest building is the cathedral, which was begun in the twelfth century. It boasts a magnificent thirteenth-century window and a spectacular row of nine lancets in the south wall. One of the two smaller churches is an excellent example of late Romanesque architecture. The other, Temple na Griffin, is named for a fascinating carving inside it – which depicts a griffin and a dragon conjoined.

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Newgrange is the best known Irish passage tomb and dates to c.3,200BC. The large mound is approximately 80m in diameter and is surrounded at its base by a kerb of 97 stones. The most impressive of these stones is the highly decorated Entrance Stone. The flat-topped cairn is almost 0.5 hectares in extent. It is roughly circular and is estimated to weigh 200,000 tonnes in total. It is made up of water-rolled stones from the terraces of the River Boyne. Excavations showed that white quartz stones from quartz veins in Co Wicklow and round granite boulders from the Mourne and Carlingford areas were used to build the revetment wall above the kerb along the front or south side of the mound. The mound covers a single tomb, which consists of a long passage and a cross-shaped chamber. The passage points to the southeast and is just less than 19 m long. It leads in to a chamber with three recesses. A corbelled roof covers the chamber. To construct the roof, the builders overlapped layers of large rocks until the roof could be sealed with a capstone, 6 metres above the floor. After 5000 years, the roof at Newgrange is still water proof. These basins which are on the floor of each of the recesses held the remains of the dead. The remains of at least five people were recovered during excavation, although originally much more bone may have been placed there. Most of the bones found were cremated, although small amounts were unburned. Grave goods of chalk and bone beads and pendants as well as some polished stone balls were placed with the dead. The entrance stone at Newgrange and Kerbstone 52 at the back of the mound are highly accomplished pieces of sculpture, regarded as some of the finest achievements of European Neolithic art. Many more of the kerbstones are also carved, some of them with carving on the side facing inwards. In the passage, some of the stones are beautifully carved particularly the 19th stone on the left, has a design which some visitors say reminds them of a stylised face. In the chamber in the back recess on the right hand side is the world famous tri-spiral design. A circle of standing stones also surrounds Newgrange. Its purpose is unclear, although recent research indicates that it could have had an astronomical function. The Stone Circle was erected sometime after 2000BC since excavation have shown that one of the stones of the circle lies directly on top of the Early Bronze Age Pit Circle. Originally there may have been more stones in the circle. Possibly some were broken up over the years. This was the final phase of building at Newgrange.

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Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, England, two miles west of Amesbury. It consists of an outer ring of vertical sarsen standing stones, each around 13 feet high, seven feet wide, and weighing around 25 tons, topped by connecting horizontal lintel stones. The true meaning of Stonehenge - this ancient, awe-inspiring creation has been lost in the mists of time. Was it a temple for sun worship, a healing centre, a burial site or perhaps a huge calendar? How did our ancestors manage to carry the mighty stones from so far away and then, using only the most primitive of tools, build this amazing structure? Surrounded by mystery, Stonehenge never fails to impress.

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Sir John Soane’s Museum is the extraordinary house and museum of the British architect Sir John Soane (1753-1837). On this page, discover the history of the Museum, its founder and its world class collections. Sir John Soane was one of the foremost architects of the Regency era, a Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy, and a dedicated collector of paintings, sculpture, architectural fragments and models, books, drawings and furniture. Born in 1753, the fourth son of a bricklayer, his father’s professional links with architects and his own natural talent for drawing won him the opportunity to train as an architect. A talented and hard-working student, Soane was awarded the Royal Academy’s prestigious Gold Medal for Architecture, as a result receiving a bursary (funded by King George III) to undertake a Grand Tour of Europe. His travels to the ruins of Ancient Rome, Paestum and Pompeii would inspire his lifelong interest in Classical art and architecture. Soane’s inventive use of light, space and his experimentation with the forms of Classical architecture earned him great success as an architect. During his career he won numerous high-profile projects, including the Bank of England (where he was architect for 45 years) and Dulwich Picture Gallery, and created his own extraordinary home and Museum on Lincoln’s Inn Fields. His successes as an architect and his fascination with the history of architecture let to his appointment as Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806. Already an enthusiastic collector, he began to repurpose his home at Lincoln’s Inn Fields as a Museum for students of architecture.

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Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) is the UK’s leading open-air art gallery, with 500 acres of beautiful historic parkland and six indoor galleries. Art Fund Museum of the Year 2014. YSP is a centre for learning excellence, with modern and contemporary sculpture, the landscape, and unique outdoor features improving the lives of adults, children, young people and their families. The artistic programme and estate are generators for learning programmes that support creativity, social engagement and personal aspiration. YSP’s unique assets are a powerful stimulus, promoting wellbeing and engagement in a way that is not possible in a traditional classroom or care setting. All programmes build on acquired knowledge from action-research projects and inspire engagement in the arts and landscape. YSP’s vibrant learning programmes provide opportunities for learners of all ages and YSP’s pioneering work is highly acknowledged. YSP has established formal, family and wellbeing learning programmes, with over 40,000 people participating each year. YSP has an outstanding record of engaging groups often excluded from arts and culture. This includes projects with children and families from socio-economically disadvantaged communities and people with lived experience of mental health needs. With our distinctive focus on art, landscape, ecology and heritage, Yorkshire Sculpture Park provides new opportunities to further develop innovative learning and outreach provision, and reaches less engaged communities through a series of thoughtful interventions and activities.

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The Scottish National Gallery displays some of the greatest art in the world, including masterpieces by Botticelli, Raphael, Titian, El Greco, Velázquez, Rembrandt, Vermeer, van Dyck, Tiepolo, Landseer, Gainsborough, Constable, Turner, and Angelica Kauffmann amongst many others. The most comprehensive part of the collection covers the history of Scottish painting – including Ramsay, Raeburn and Wilkie. The Scottish National Gallery comprises both the National Gallery Building and the Royal Scottish Academy Building. Both of these buildings, designed by William Henry Playfair, stand in the heart of Edinburgh.

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Stirling Castle is a great symbol of Scottish independence & a source of national pride. Visitors can now step back into the sumptuous world of Stirling Castle’s royal court. Our £12 million project has returned the six apartments in the castle’s Renaissance palace to how they may have looked in the mid-16th century. A place of power, beauty and history, discover the favoured residence of Scotland's Kings and Queens! A great day out for all the family and simply unmissable! Stirling Castle was the key to the kingdom of Scotland, dominating a vast volcanic rock above the river Forth at the meeting point between Lowlands and Highlands. Its origins are ancient and over the centuries it grew into a great royal residence and a powerful stronghold. During the Wars of Independence, which were civil wars among the Scots as well as a struggle between Scotland and England, the castle changed hands eight times in 50 years. And it is no accident that famous battles such as Stirling Bridge and Bannockburn took place within sight of its walls. In times of peace Scottish royalty came to Stirling to enjoy its comforts, the superb hunting and to hold court – the castle was often the centre of government.

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Located beside the Titanic Slipways, the Harland & Wolff Drawing Offices and Hamilton Graving Dock – the very place where Titanic was designed, built and launched, Titanic Belfast tells the story of Titanic from her conception, through her construction and launch, to her maiden voyage and subsequent place in history. Stimulating enquiry, encouraging independent and collaborative learning and awakening a genuine thirst for knowledge - Titanic Belfast is a unique learning resource for students of all ages. Titanic Belfast welcomes education visitors all year round for self-guided tours of the Titanic Experience. On arrival you will be supported by a welcome host, who will set the scene and give you advice before you enter. Supported by our downloadable resources which cover the activities and themes you’ll find in the exhibition and how these link with curriculum targets in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, a self-guided tour allows you and your pupils to explore the sights, sounds and stories of Titanic Belfast at your own leisure.

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The Pearse Museum in St Enda’s Park is where the leader of the 1916 Rising, Patrick Pearse, lived and operated his pioneering Irish-speaking school from 1910 to 1916. Set in nearly 20 hectares of attractive parkland in Rathfarnham, Dublin, the museum tells the story of Patrick Pearse and his brother Willie, both of whom were executed for their part in the 1916 Rising. Here you can peruse a fascinating exhibition on Pearse’s life and wander through the historic rooms where he, his family and his students once lived and worked. The romantic landscape surrounding the museum contains a wild river valley, forested areas and some enchanting eighteenth- and nineteenth-century follies. If you are interested in the park’s varied wildlife, you will find information about it in a dedicated room in the courtyard – where you’ll also find the Schoolroom Café.

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Rodney Harrison is Professor of Heritage Studies at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. He has experience working in, teaching and researching natural and cultural heritage conservation, management and preservation in the UK, Europe, Australia, North America and South America. His research has been funded by AHRC/UKRI, GCRF, British Academy, Wenner-Gren Foundation, Australian Research Council, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and the European Commission. Rodney was Principal Investigator and led both the Diversity theme and the Heritage Futures research programme. [/box[

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The AHRC Heritage Priority Area team – led by Professor Rodney Harrison, University College London – works with the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), the heritage research community, and heritage partner organisations, to draw together and stimulate the development of a wide range of research across the arts and humanities that make an important contribution to understanding heritage. We take on an expansive view of heritage, and aim to encourage and stimulate work that highlights intersections between natural and cultural heritage, and key global challenges. ​We are currently working with AHRC to develop a programme of events and activities which will help us to address these aims. We have our own specific set of research themes which we aim to engage as part of our research and leadership activities.

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London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core, colloquially known as the Square Mile, retains boundaries that follow closely their medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly. London is often considered as the world's leading global city and has been termed as the world's most powerful, most desirable, most influential, most visited, most expensive, innovative, sustainable, most investment-friendly, most popular for work, and the most vegetarian-friendly city in the world. London exerts a considerable impact upon the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transportation. London ranks 26 out of 300 major cities for economic performance. It is one of the largest financial centers.

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