Africa

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Africa

During the past 60 years the Durban African Art Centre Association (African Art Centre) has provided hundred of artists and crafters with opportunities for self-employment and the realization of their talents. Originally established as a programme of the South African Institute of Race Relations in 1959, the African Art Centre has, since 1984, operated as a non-profit organization. It was guided by the late Jo Thorpe, who virtually single-handed, put Durban on the map as an important centre of black artistic development. Since its inception, the African Art Centre has successfully facilitated and implemented relevant development and mentorship programmes and showcase opportunities for hundreds of artists and crafters from rural and urban KwaZulu-Natal. The Centre is recognized as one of the longest running South African organizations involved in the development and marketing of the works produced by disadvantaged artists and crafters. Through various marketing initiatives, every attempt is made to assist artists and crafters to tap into domestic, provincial, national and international markets. Our shop and gallery now situated in premises at The Phansi Museum at 500 Esther Roberts Road, Glenwood, Durban, allows us to professionally showcase and promote the works of artists and crafters on an on going basis.

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The Bartolomeu Dias museum complex was officially opened on 3 February 1989, however the Mossel Bay museum industry can be traced back to the 1960’s when the Mossel Bay museum was first opened. The museum later became known as the Post Tree museum complex before being renamed again in 1989. The Bartolomeu Dias Museum Complex is the second biggest provincial museum affiliated to the Western Cape Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport in South Africa. It is located at Mossel Bay.OverviewThe Bartolomeu Dias Museum is a multi-disciplinary government institution which is mandated to preserve and conserve the local cultural and natural heritage resources for education and enjoyment of both local and foreign visitors. It is also required to contribute to the economic growth of the area by attracting visitors from various parts of the world who end up spending their money in the local businesses. Since its inception the Dias Museum has been a cornerstone of the tourism industry in Mossel Bay. Many people who travel via Garden Route from Cape Town to Port Elizabeth and vice versa come to Mossel Bay to see the museum. Museum facilities are utilized by various local organizations and individuals for cultural events, meetings, workshops and conferences. Bartolomeu Dias landing in Mossel Bay in 1488. The whole museum site is a provincial heritage site.The museum's scope is multidisciplinary in nature as it covers both cultural and natural history of Mossel Bay. The site's botanical garden is vegetated by indigenous plants and trees which were used as herbs by the early inhabitants of the area. In the site there is a grave of the Malay slave which is presently used as a place of worship by the local Muslim community. The museum is called a "complex" because it consists of three buildings, namely the Maritime Museum, Shell Museum, and the Granary. Within the museum site there are also two 19th-century edifices called Munro cottages.

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Italian art and culture has influenced and shaped many of the things we enjoy today, over centuries, to name just a few, fashion, food, architecture, invention, legal systems even - if this isn't enough for you, what of the joy you experience when you hear the language spoken... Exploring Italian art, lifestyle and culture is tops on my #bucketlist My bio informs the "why" and the "how" I'll tick this item off my list... I have for too long, been as a ship anchored, safely in Port. This is not what this ship was made for - I yearn to set sail, to explore the world. The time is near, the winds of change favourable. I have a few projects I’m busy with presently and I’m pregnant with promise and ambition. I am excited, committed, determined to tick off every item on my #BucketList, among the items - to #Managemybusiness #WorkFromWherever #exploreItaly, most of all, committed to move forward into the fullness of my raison d’être. Professionally trained as an attorney, practicing family, contract and insurance law, on a part-time basis, allowing me to pick and choose my clients and cases. I am also a business owner and manager of a SCUBA diving training and charter company, a qualified SCUBA diver instructor, coach and mentor to dive professional trainees. Personally, I am a 42 year old woman, living and working in a beautiful corner of the world, at the edge of the Garden Route, in a little town called Mossel Bay, South Africa for 10 years. I’m married 9 years and I have a 17 year old son. I also have two adult step-daughters and two young (step) grand-daughters. I am a also a #dreamer and I dream big dreams. I am an extrovert, not shy to shine, unafraid to lead. I have entrepreneurial vision but pragmatism and circumstance have made for very practical decisions over the last two decades, leaving my dreams shelved, to gather only dust. I have it settled deep within my spirit, the desire to impact lives, in a beneficial way, and to do so, not just at home, but far and wide.

 Listings /  Africa

Mandy Shrimpton is the quintessential people’s person. Mandy believes that success is measured by the quality of our human-relationships rather than the results we manifest through sheer will. Mandy firmly established herself as the heart of the non-profit organisation that she co-founded and ran with her adoring husband for 17 years. Mandy loves walking in nature with her family, hugging trees, and preserving the environment. She also enjoys being creative and is particularly fond of painting flowers. As a very happily married and devoted mother to four children, Mandy has cultivated a deep appreciation for the culinary arts and relishes the spare moments she gets to watch her favourite cooking shows. This initiative reflects how Mandy sees the world, helping to create positive synergy. Fostering unity and courteous community, building partner relationships and motivating affiliates. Born and bred in Africa, Mandy understands the concept of Ubuntu. I am, because we are. Together we can make the world a better place. Using her skills and experience to make a difference. Helping others see through the fog of new technologies, avoid common marketing mistakes and develop better business strategies. With a subtle blend of motherhood and effective project management, Mandy is the perfect professional partner, to show others the merits of this initiative. Shining a light on the path to prosperity, while not losing our footing in family values and humble humanity. Sharing is caring, while enriching ourselves spiritually and materially. We cannot give freely, if we don't have. "Sometimes the world makes more sense, through the eyes of a mother. Using protective instinct and family fortitude, to help one another." ~ Mandy Shrimpton

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Potchefstroom is an academic city in the North West Province of South Africa. It hosts the Potchefstroom Campus of the North-West University. Potchefstroom is on the Mooi Rivier, roughly 120 km west-southwest of Johannesburg and 45 km east-northeast of Klerksdorp. The official history of Potchefstroom, written by Prof Gert van den Bergh, accepts the official founding date as 22 December 1838. This is due to a newspaper report that appeared in the ‘The Natal Advertiser’ in 1921 which said “Old Mr Barent Swart, of Klerksdorp, furnished me many years ago with . . . an exact date of its founding. His words were: ‘Oudedorp was proclaimed a dorp on December 22, 1838." By the time this was written the town was relocated and the first settlement was known as Oudedorp (old town). Although it has been severely contested, it is generally accepted that Potchefstroom is the oldest town founded by the Voortrekkers north of the Vaal River. Potchefstroom was named after its founder, Andries Potgieter, hence the syllable ‘Pot’ in the name. ‘Stroom’ came from the Mooi River, but about the origin of the ‘chef’ there has been much speculation. It is generally accepted that it was inserted because Potgieter was the leader, chief or ‘chef’ of the Voortrekkers. Another explanation is that people with the surname of Potgieter was nicknamed ‘Potscherf’, an alternative spelling of the name. Combined with ‘stroom’, this was difficult to pronounce and the name later became Potchefstroom instead of Potscherfstroom, which has been used to a certain extent in the early years. Today Potchefstroom is a thriving city with close to 140 000 residents. It is the home of the Potchefstroom campus of the Northwest University. The Northwest University also has two other campuses, in Mahikeng and Vanderbijlpark. With more than 55 000 students, it is the second largest university in the country. It's certainly a town worth the visit if you want to have the feeling of real Africa.

 Listings /  Africa

The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza pyramid complex bordering present-day Giza in Greater Cairo, Egypt. It is also called the Giza Necropolis, and is the site on the Giza Plateau in Greater Cairo, that includes the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Pyramid of Khafre, and the Pyramid of Menkaure, along with their associated pyramid complexes and the Great Sphinx of Giza. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to remain largely intact. Based on a mark in an interior chamber naming the work gang and a reference to the Fourth Dynasty Egyptian Pharaoh Khufu, some Egyptologists believe that the pyramid was thus built as a tomb over a 10- to 20-year period concluding around 2560 BC. The Great Pyramid consists of an estimated 2.3 million blocks which most believe to have been transported from nearby quarries. The Tura limestone used for the casing was quarried across the river. The largest granite stones in the pyramid, found in the "King's" chamber, weigh 25 to 80 tonnes and were transported from Aswan, more than 800 km (500 mi) away.

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Saint Helena is a volcanic tropical island in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is part of the British Overseas Territory of Saint Helena. Saint Helena Island, was one of the many isolated islands that naturalist Charles Darwin visited during his scientific voyages in the nineteenth century. He visited the island in 1836 aboard the HMS Beagle, recording observations of the plants, animals, and geology that would shape his theory of evolution. Saint Helena Island is perhaps best known as the place where Napoleon Bonaparte I of France was exiled following his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815; he died and was buried on the island in 1821. Later, his remains were returned to France. Today, the island is a British Overseas Territory, with access provided thirty times a year by a single ship, the Royal Mail Ship St. Helena.

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Johannesburg, South Africa's biggest city and capital of Gauteng province, began as a 19th-century gold-mining settlement. Its sprawling Soweto township was once home to Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu. Other Soweto museums that recount the struggle to end segregation include the somber Apartheid Museum and Constitution Hill, a former prison complex. Commonly known as Jo’burg or Jozi, this rapidly changing city is the vibrant heart of South Africa. After almost 20 years of decline and decay, Johannesburg is now looking optimistically towards the future. Its center is smartening up and new loft apartments and office developments are being constructed at a rapid pace. The hipster-friendly neighborhood of Maboneng is considered one of the most successful urban renewal projects in the world. However, the wealth divide remains stark, and crime and poverty haven't been eliminated.

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Cape Town is the oldest city in South Africa, colloquially named the Mother City. Cape Town is a port city on South Africa’s southwest coast, on a peninsula beneath the imposing Table Mountain. Slowly rotating cable cars climb to the mountain’s flat top, from which there are sweeping views of the city, the busy harbor, and boats heading for Robben Island, the notorious prison that once held Nelson Mandela, which is now a living museum. A coming-together of cultures, cuisines, and landscapes, there's nowhere quite like Cape Town, a singularly beautiful city crowned by the magnificent Table Mountain National Park.

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Tutankhamun's mask, or funerary mask of Tutankhamun, is the death mask of the 18th-dynasty ancient Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun. It was discovered by Howard Carter in 1925 in tomb KV62 and is now housed in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. The mask is one of the best-known works of art in the world. Bearing the likeness of Osiris, Egyptian god of the afterlife, it is 54 centimetres (1.8 ft) tall, weighs over 10 kilograms (22 lb) or 321.5 Troy Ounces, and is decorated with semi-precious stones. An ancient spell from the Book of the Dead is inscribed in hieroglyphs on the mask's shoulders. The mask had to be restored in 2015 after its 2.5-kilogram (5.5 lb) plaited beard fell off and was hastily glued back on by museum workers. According to Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves, the mask is "not only the quintessential image from Tutankhamun's tomb, it is perhaps the best-known object from ancient Egypt itself

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The Cradle of Humankind region in South Africa, which is approximately 90 minutes' drive from the Johannesburg city centre, offers visitors the opportunity to learn about stones and bones, wine and dine in tranquil surroundings, try out a range of adrenalin-pumping activities, have a beautiful wedding, discover a range of wonderful wildlife and experience culture and craft. The Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site is one of eight in the country. It's the world's richest hominin site, home to around 40% of the world's human ancestor fossils. The area is also home to a diversity of birds, animals and plants, some of which are rare or endangered.

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The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, known commonly as the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo, Egypt, is home to an extensive collection of ancient Egyptian antiquities. It has 120,000 items, with a representative amount on display, the remainder in storerooms. The Museo Egizio is world’s the oldest museum devoted entirely to ancient Egyptian culture. Discover the fundamental stages of its formation, from the creation of the collection to the present. In 1824, King Charles Felix acquired the material from the Drovetti collection (5,268 pieces, including 100 statues, 170 papyri, stelae, mummies, and other items), that the French General Consul, Bernardino Drovetti, had built during his stay in Egypt. In the same year, Jean-François Champollion used the huge Turin collection of papyri to test his breakthroughs in deciphering the hieroglyphic writing. The time Champollion spent in Turin studying the texts is also the origin of a legend about the mysterious disappearance of the "Papiro Regio", that was only later found and of which some portions are still unavailable. In 1950 a parapsychologist was contacted to pinpoint them, to no avail.

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Abu Simbel, is an archaeological site of Egypt. It is located in the Governorate of Aswan, in southern Egypt, on the western shore of Lake Nasser. In ancient times the area was at the southern frontier of pharaonic Egypt, facing Nubia. The four colossal statues of Ramses in front of the main temple are spectacular examples of ancient Egyptian art. It dates back to 1264 A.C. Besides their grandeur, the Abu Simbel temples are notable because they were moved in 1964 to make way for the High Aswan Dam.

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